How the Mulino Caputo's flours are produced

21 October 2019

Flour is in itself a travel through the history and culture of our people. Here, then, is a small handbook which explains the work of a mill, i.e. the work that brings together fields and dining tables.

Today the simple act of taking the flour from the pantry and make pizzas, bread, cakes or other delicious dishes is something that seems almost expected. However, behind the flour there are thousands of years of history and a lot of work. Here's how the Mulino Caputo's flours are made.


Flour is in itself a travel through the history and culture of our people. A complex journey that transforms a grain of wheat into the basis of the Italian cuisine and of the Neapolitan one in particular.


Here, then, is a small handbook which explains the work of a mill, i.e. the work that brings together fields and dining tables.


Let's take this step by step…


The grain arrives at the mill immediately after the harvest and, through underground conveyors, it is subjected to a Pre-cleaning process. This is the first step in the flour processing and it is needed to remove the large impurities that come from direct contact with the soil.



The pre-cleaned grain then arrives to the storage cells where it is divided according to its quality or origin.
After choosing the intended mix of grains, the actual processing begins with the first cleaning stage.



With the first cleaning another phase of removal of rough impurities takes place. The process is then followed and completed by sieving and vacuuming to eliminate the fine and less fine dust that is usually deposited on the grain.



After a new storage in silos, the grain will then be picked up for the second cleaning.
The second cleaning includes a rubbing process that eliminates the outer film of the grain, often subject to air pollution.



This is the starting point for the actual milling process, which also includes the separation process.



Grinding takes place in the rolling mills where the roller cylinders crush mechanically the grains.



The second step of the flour processing takes place by means of huge sifters. They separate the bran from the thin parts, the semolina.


The bran parts will then go to a second grinding step, while the semolina will be processed by other screening machines to be further purified from the bran.


Only the semolina, through further grinding passages which will gradually reduce its grain size, will become flour.
The flours are stored in silos before being packaged and arrive in the pantries of our craftsmen.



Crushing, sieving, and cleaning: this short journey through the flour processing makes it is easy to understand that the work of a mill is absolutely natural and exclusively mechanical. No chemical agent is used in the various single processing steps. That is, the flour has been feeding and nourishing people for millennia, in a completely simple and healthy way, even in the modern era of thousand sophistications. The work of the mills is only that of putting technology at the service of quality control!