Slow grinding: Mulino Caputo's secret

02 April 2020

Mulino Caputo's work does not start with cylinders and sieves, but begins way before with the choice of the raw materials and the selection of the varieties of Italian and European wheat that will be transformed into the flour that we all know.

What does slow grinding mean and why Mulino Caputo chooses this method to work its Italian and European grains? Find out what a chef and a miller have in common!


Mulino Caputo's work does not start with cylinders and sieves, but begins way before with the choice of the raw materials and the selection of the varieties of Italian and European wheat that will be transformed into the flour that we all know.


The processing method is therefore chosen to enhance the natural excellence that comes from the field.


After all, a miller is like a chef. Find out why.
As a chef tries to enhance the best raw materials they have chosen on the market by selecting the most suitable cooking method, so a miller prepares the grinding method most apt for the excellence of his grains, as we are told by Mauro Caputo, technical manager of the Mill of Naples.
And it is the slow grinding that makes so special the flours from Mulino Caputo.

<<Grinding the wheat in several steps by means of a cylinder mill with 30-35 grinding and sifting steps, ensures a gradual and gently transformation into flour at processing temperatures kept as close as possible to the environmental one - Mauro Caputo goes on - This type of processing guarantees a completely mechanical and natural transformation of the grain without altering the gluten proteins and with very low damage to the starch.>>


In practice, it is thanks to the choice of slow grinding that all the properties of the grains selected by Mulino Caputo remain intact.
That explains why the Caputo flours are different:
-High performance of the gluten mesh

-Good starch activity in the splitting of sugars.