Oro Manitoba e Nuova Oro: all the strength of Mulino Caputo!

25 October 2020

Different uses, same quality, for a value that comes from the almost century-long expertise that Mulino Caputo puts in each of its products, sketching a fully true color palette, ready to adapt itself to the needs of any individual artisan.


Oro e Oro Manitoba - similar names, great differences. Find out which suits you better with our special identikit
Two flours for long-leavening products, so important in confectionery. Different uses, same quality, for a value that comes from the almost century-long expertise that Mulino Caputo puts in each of its products, sketching a fully true color palette, ready to adapt itself to the needs of any individual artisan.


The shade that we present today is the precious one of gold, a totally true enrichment expressed in several nuances and apt for a wide range of uses, not just for confectionery.
These are the differences between Manitoba Gold and New Gold


Manitoba Oro
Manitoba Oro in its 1 and 5kg sacks is a strong, high gluten flour useful for a range of application and particularly apt for pastry making. In the traditional confectionery it is widely used for cakes, creams, but also for homemade leavened creations. But this strong flour is also used in pizzerias as a blending flour to reinforce mixtures. This means that when the Sacco Rosso and Pizzeria flours are not strong enough for the hours of leavening needed for a preparation, they can be reinforced with the right amount of Manitoba Oro to obtain the desired result!
The New Oro
If the Manitoba Oro finds application at home too, Nuova Oro is designed primarily for a professional artisan use and indeed is marketed in the classic 25kg sack!
Nuova Oro was essentially designed by the Mill of Naples for professional super-leavened products. Panettone, pandoro, colomba, and baba: many are the uses for which Nuova Oro is the undisputed protagonist of quality!
Why?
The selection of grains and therefore the structure of Nuova Oro guarantee a high absorption of liquids and fats that make it particularly suitable for very rich recipes, including croissants and graffe.
The processing details remain unchanged. Both Manitoba Oro and Nuova Oro are the result of a careful selection of the raw material and a very slow milling method that leaves the characteristics of the grain unchanged.
The result jumps out at you immediately at the exit from the oven!

Which one do you choose?